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WASHINGTON — President Biden on Wednesday declared his organization’s arrangement to battle increasing paces of fierce wrongdoing that plague significant urban communities across the United States by further clasping down on weapon viciousness.

“I’ve been at this quite a while,” said Biden, who was joined by Attorney General Merrick Garland. “There are things we realize that work to diminish firearm brutality and vicious wrongdoing: personal investigations for buying a gun are significant; [a] restriction on attack weapons and high limit magazines; local area policing programs that keep neighborhoods safe and keep people in the clear. These endeavors work, they save lives.”

The White House is looking to address various issues through a whirlwind of leader orders, from removing the progression of illicitly offered guns, to extending summer programs, and strikingly by utilizing a lump of Covid help cash for regions and regions to assign to police offices. Prior Wednesday, Biden met with a few pertinent partners, assembling Garland, chairmen from Baltimore, Miami-Dade province, and Rapid City, S.D, activists and police delegates trying to arrive at an agreement on a way ahead.

In his remarks, Biden renewed calls for Congress to pass comprehensive gun legislation as two relevant loophole-closing bills sit in legislative limbo; like the fate of many Biden-supported bills, they seem destined to fail due to lack of any Republican support.

“We know that if there is a strict enforcement of background checks, then fewer guns get into the hands of criminals,” Biden said Wednesday. “Background checks have thus far kept more than 3 million guns out of the hands of convicted felons, fugitives, domestic abusers and others prohibited from being able to purchase a gun. And there’s still too many loopholes in that system.”

Yet the White House is only so powerful on its own. Executive actions can drive parts of the federal government to take swift action; for example, the Department of Justice recently announced its own initiative to target firearms trafficking. But little can be permanently changed without assistance from Capitol Hill.

Currently, Congress faces a legislative logjam as it approaches the Independence Day recess, with Democrats unable to score a victory on any of Biden’s major policy proposals. Several attempts to create police reform legislation led by a bipartisan working group on Capitol Hill have all but failed, with the White House taking a backseat in public engagement on the topic as both Republicans and Democrats in the Senate hash out their red lines.

The White House’s initial police reform deadline has come and gone, and advocates and progressives are growing weary of what they perceive as Biden’s inaction. Some negotiators, though, see growing concerns about crime in their area, and residents who want a unified police force now more than ever, as a possible barrier to passing police reform. But the White House disagrees that the goals are contradictory.

“Yes, there need to be reforms of police systems across the country. The president is a firm believer in that,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said during a briefing on Tuesday. “But there are also steps he can take as president of the United States to help address and hopefully reduce that crime. A big part of that, in his view, is putting in place gun safety measures … using the bully pulpit but also using levers at his disposal as president.”

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