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The Weeknd turned in a bizarre, but mostly enjoyable, high-concept mini-concert during the Super Bowl LV Halftime Show on Sunday at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.

Appearing first before our eyes as the driver in a two-seater sports car, parked in front of a Vegas-like backdrop, the 30-year-old Toronto talent — born Abel Tesfaye — then stepped out of the car and took a seat at the edge of the stage. The camera pans back and we realize the edge of the stage was actually the top of the stage — and that there was a legion of performers below who appeared to be wearing masks borrowed from some “Star Wars” knockoff. There was a definite church-motif going on as well, with these Boba Fett wannabees forming a type of a choir.

Then the Weeknd — wearing a red jacket with a black shirt and tie — burst into action, rocketing off from the other-worldly overture with the title track to 2016’s “Starboy.”

If it felt like we were joining a story already in progress — well, that’s because we were. The multiplatinum-selling R&B star was using the biggest stage in both sports and music to continue on with the complicated story he’s been telling with the music from his latest hit album, “After Hours.” It has something to do with one wild night, gone terribly wrong, but the Weeknd doesn’t really connect many dots beyond those basic points.

Those who aren’t Weeknd aficionados probably missed the whole concept storyline altogether — which is fine since all seven of the songs played could stand on their own. Yet, it was hard to shake the feeling that the whole thing just wasn’t jelling the way it should.

Plus, the complex storyline resulted in another disappointing turn of events — no guest stars. But, to be fair, the Weeknd alerted people early in the week that he would be breaking with that longstanding Super Bowl tradition.

“There wasn’t any room to fit it in the narrative, in the story I was telling in the performance,” he said during an interview with NFL Network. “So yeah. There’s no special guests.”

Yet, advance notice can only do so much. There were likely many fans — especially those who didn’t hear the NFL Networks interview — who were probably hoping that someone like Drake or Ariana Grande might show up for the festivities. And it would have been really great to see an appearance by Daft Punk, especially given that they originally performed on two of the better songs that made the set list — “Starboy” and “I Feel It Coming.”

Grooving alongside a big group of extras — who had left their “Star Wars” masks behind in favor of sporting those facial bandages that play into the “After Hours” narrative as well as matching red jackets with black shirts and ties — the Weeknd continued through such songs as “The Hills” and “Can’t Feel My Face.”

The Weeknd turned in a bizarre, but mostly enjoyable, high-concept mini-concert during the Super Bowl LV Halftime Show on Sunday at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.

Appearing first before our eyes as the driver in a two-seater sports car, parked in front of a Vegas-like backdrop, the 30-year-old Toronto talent — born Abel Tesfaye — then stepped out of the car and took a seat at the edge of the stage. The camera pans back and we realize the edge of the stage was actually the top of the stage — and that there was a legion of performers below who appeared to be wearing masks borrowed from some “Star Wars” knockoff. There was a definite church-motif going on as well, with these Boba Fett wannabees forming a type of a choir.

Then the Weeknd — wearing a red jacket with a black shirt and tie — burst into action, rocketing off from the other-worldly overture with the title track to 2016’s “Starboy.”

If it felt like we were joining a story already in progress — well, that’s because we were. The multiplatinum-selling R&B star was using the biggest stage in both sports and music to continue on with the complicated story he’s been telling with the music from his latest hit album, “After Hours.” It has something to do with one wild night, gone terribly wrong, but the Weeknd doesn’t really connect many dots beyond those basic points.

Those who aren’t Weeknd aficionados probably missed the whole concept storyline altogether — which is fine since all seven of the songs played could stand on their own. Yet, it was hard to shake the feeling that the whole thing just wasn’t jelling the way it should.

Plus, the complex storyline resulted in another disappointing turn of events — no guest stars. But, to be fair, the Weeknd alerted people early in the week that he would be breaking with that longstanding Super Bowl tradition.

“There wasn’t any room to fit it in the narrative, in the story I was telling in the performance,” he said during an interview with NFL Network. “So yeah. There’s no special guests.”

Yet, advance notice can only do so much. There were likely many fans — especially those who didn’t hear the NFL Networks interview — who were probably hoping that someone like Drake or Ariana Grande might show up for the festivities. And it would have been really great to see an appearance by Daft Punk, especially given that they originally performed on two of the better songs that made the set list — “Starboy” and “I Feel It Coming.”

Grooving alongside a big group of extras — who had left their “Star Wars” masks behind in favor of sporting those facial bandages that play into the “After Hours” narrative as well as matching red jackets with black shirts and ties — the Weeknd continued through such songs as “The Hills” and “Can’t Feel My Face.”

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