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In the end, it wasn’t any one tweet that disqualified Neera Tanden from joining President Joe Biden’s Cabinet. It was the entire platform that is punishing the seasoned Washington player.

Biden had tapped Tanden, the head of the liberal Center for American Progress, to run the low-visibility, high-power Office of Management and Budget. But from the start, Senators from both parties took issue with some of the text rockets fired from her Twitter app in recent years, turning the often late-night missives into a test of her fitness to run the biggest piece of the Executive Office of the President.

In a move long expected, anticipated here in The D.C. Brief back on Dec. 1, Tanden yesterday asked Biden to withdraw her nomination.

This morality play that has been unfolding over weeks in Washington has a few key takeaways: Twitter can block not just a user but also a career path, and the obsession over social media’s value may be cripplingly over-stated in politics.

Much can be written about the disconnect between Tanden’s welcoming personality and her combative persona, not to mention just how much her gender and race played a role in the opposition to her confirmation. (Tanden would have been the first woman of color to run OMB.) And the opposition’s claim that she is too partisan to do her job does require some intentional blind spots, such as missives the Washington Post’s E.J. Dionne noted in his column just last week.

After Tanden lost the support of Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin, her nomination had to pick up the backing of at least one Republican. That put a harsh focus on Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, whom Tanden had praised back in 2017. The pair met yesterday to discuss the nomination, and shortly after Tanden withdrew, and went to bed a failed nominee.

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